Our Metabolic Disruption Technology (MDT) compounds impede tumor cells’ ability to meet their increased energy requirements, leaving cancer cells vulnerable to cancer-killing agents.

MDT compounds can be combined with existing treatments to fight drug-resistant cancers. They sensitize cancer cells to treatment by disrupting the metabolic strategies those cells use to survive.

Since cancer cells rapidly divide, they have very high-energy demands, and they employ unique metabolic mechanisms to meet those demands. Those mechanisms represent pathways that could be targets for novel therapies. Specifically, we are honing in on glucose and lipid consumption and autophagy inhibition. Our research indicates that metabolic disrupting agents prevent sufficient energy generation to weaken the tumor cells’ repair functions, slow their growth, and raise their susceptibility to common standards of care.

Our in-vitro and in-vivo research indicates that MDT compounds can interfere with both drug-sensitive and multi-drug resistant cancer cells. MDT treatments demonstrate a lack of toxicity and impressive therapeutic activity, activity that is synergistic when used with standards of care, even with drug-resistant tumor cells.

MDT treatments demonstrate a lack of toxicity and impressive therapeutic activity, activity that is synergistic when used with standards of care, even with drug-resistant tumor cells.

MDT COMPOUND FOR DRUG RESISTANT CANCER CALLED HYDROXYCHLOROQUINE

Hydroxychloroquine is a MDT compound that can be used in combination with other cancer drugs, such as sorafenib, which is marketed as Nexavar ® and co-developed by Bayer AG and Onyx Pharmaceuticals, to treat drug-resistant cancers. We hold a license to a pending patent application for the combination treatment.

Doctors at Scott & White Healthcare in Temple, Texas and the Cancer Therapy & Research Center at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio have completed a Phase 1 trial examining the safety and efficacy of the hydroxychloroquine-sorafenib combination. The study tested the tolerability and toxicity of our patented technology in patients with advanced stage solid tumors that do not respond to treatment or have returned after a period of improvement. Researchers also monitored for efficacy in reducing tumor mass or stunting growth. Our MDT trial was initially only approved for ovarian cancer but was expanded to include other solid tumors, including those located in the breast, colon, liver, lung, and pancreas.

The study was designed with four cohorts, three cycles of administration in each cohort and four different patients in each cohort. Sixteen patients were targeted to complete the trial. No patients were dropped from the study for toxicity.

Three patients showed prolonged periods of disease stabilization. A patient with metastatic ovarian cancer had four months’ disease stabilization. A patient with metastatic, triple-negative breast cancer experienced five months’ disease stabilization. And a patient with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung, a common form of lung cancer, experienced a 20-percent regression of four lesions during the course of the study.

The primary investigator was medical oncologist Dr. Tyler Curiel, M.D., M.P.H. The study is based on the research of Dr. M. Karen Newell-Rogers, Ph.D., our Chief Scientist.

VG Life Sciences is in discussions with the University of Texas regarding the feasibility of expanding the study into a Phase 2 or an extended Phase 1 P-IND. This would involve using combination therapy dosing over a 1-year period to test for efficacy.